Extrinsic vs. Intrinsic

QUOTE: My father’s deal got me to commit to a routine, and once I started running, I found that I didn’t mind exercising, I just didn’t like sports. My father’s approach might well have backfired . With extrinsic motivation, people act to win external rewards or avoid external punishments; with intrinsic motivation, people act for their own satisfaction. Studies show that if you reward people for doing an activity , they often stop doing it for fun; being paid turns it into “work.” Parents, for example, are warned not to reward children for reading— they’re teaching kids to read for a reward, not for pleasure. By giving me an extrinsic motivation, my father risked sapping my inclination to exercise on my own. As it happened, in my case, he provided an extrinsic motivation that unleashed my intrinsic motivation.

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NOTE

 

DISCERNMENT QUESTIONS

What gets your attention?

What human needs or problems relate to the quote?

What is it like to have that problem?

What other resources connect to this idea?

What is the solution suggested in the quote, if there is one?

What would a camera see if the solution was implemented in my life, in my family’s life, or in my church or community?

What are the steps that I would take on Monday to implement that solution?

 

CONTEXTUALIZING QUESTIONS 

What does this say to my context as a …

… person?

… follower of Jesus? 

… to a church? 

… to a community – my neighbors?

 

RESOURCES

The quote is from The Happiness Project: Or, Why I Spent a Year Trying to Sing in the Morning, Clean My Closets, Fight Right, Read Aristotle, and Generally Have More Fun by Gretchen Rubin,  located at page

Start reading this book for free: http://a.co/1TAFhYW

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