10-31.36 “The cell is not in a state of ‘internal starvation’ but is instead overflowing with glucose.

QUOTE from Dr Fung (emphasis mine): 

The cell is not in a state of ‘internal starvation’ but is instead overflowing with glucose. One of the most basic principles of toxicology is that the dose makes the poison. Even oxygen in excess is toxic. The same is true for glucose. While some glucose is good, excessive glucose is noxious. Glucose is not toxic, but there’s simply too much of it. The liver feverishly tries to unload itself of the toxic glucose load by converting it into fat via DNL, but this protective mechanism is overwhelmed by the sheer amount of glucose trying to force its way inside. This explains how the cell can appear to be insulin resistant (glucose outside cells) and insulin super-sensitive (enhanced DNL) at the same time. The central paradox of insulin resistance is solved. Mischief managed. This new paradigm crucially answers the question of how insulin resistance develops and leads naturally to a solution. Too much glucose and too much insulin cause the problem of insulin resistance. Obviously, the ideal solution is to lower glucose and lower insulin. Once you lower insulin resistance you can reverse T2DM” [1]

NOTE (my commentary)

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The cell is not in a state of ‘internal starvation’ but is instead overflowing with glucose.

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Too much glucose and too much insulin cause the problem of insulin resistance.

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STRATEGY:

DISCERNMENT QUESTIONS
1. What gets your attention?
2. What does it say about Reality? (Any misperceptions to correct?)
3. What does it say that I need to obey? (What should be added to my strategy?)
4. How can I incorporate what is true into my Disciplines? (Specific methods?)
5. What questions do I have for the experts? What might be the answers?

SOURCE – Footnotes:
[1] Chapter Three: What causes Type 2 diabetes? – Dr Jason Fung, in Diabetes Unpacked: Just Science and Sense. No Sugar Coating by Tim Noakes, Jason Fung, et. al.

Photo by Diabetes Care, Insulin, via Flickr

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Fung-10-31.36 Origin: Last Revision: 07/21/2020

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