51 STEP 4: INCREASE YOUR CONSUMPTION OF NATURAL FATS

QUOTE from Dr Fung (emphasis mine): 

OF THE THREE major macronutrients (carbohydrates, proteins and fats), dietary fat is the least likely to stimulate insulin. Thus, dietary fat is not inherently fattening, but potentially protective. (For more about fat as a protective factor, see chapter 18.) In choosing fats, strive for a higher proportion of natural fats. Natural, unprocessed fats include olive oil, butter, coconut oil, beef tallow and leaf lard. The highly processed vegetable oils, high in inflammatory omega 6 fatty acids, may have some detrimental health effects.” [1]

NOTE (my commentary): In the Fung five-step recipe for weight loss, calories subtracted by not adding sugar or processed carbohydrates are balanced by adding natural fat from nonprocessed sources: olive oil, butter, coconut oil, beef tallow and leaf lard.

I imagine a plate divided into thirds – one-third carbohydrates, one-third protein, and one-third vegetables. Leave the third for carbs empty and replace them with vegetables – 2/3 of the plate. Provide flavor to the vegetables with healthy fats such as butter or sour cream. Saute them in olive oil.

Wikipedia: Tallow is a rendered form of beef or mutton fat, and is primarily made up of triglycerides. It is solid at room temperature. Unlike suet, tallow can be stored for extended periods without the need for refrigeration to prevent decomposition, provided it is kept in an airtight container to prevent oxidation. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tallow

Wikipedia: Lard can be obtained from any part of the pig that has a high concentration of fatty tissue. The highest grade of lard, known as leaf lard, is obtained from the “flare” visceral fat deposit surrounding the kidneys and inside the loin. Leaf lard has little pork flavor, making it ideal for use in baked goods, where it is valued for its ability to produce flaky, moist pie crusts. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lard

Eat the Yolks: Discover Paleo, fight food lies, and reclaim your health Kindle Edition
by Liz Wolfe describes many of the health problems related to using highly processed commercial “crop oils” – she refers to them a “crap” oils. Avoid them entirely.

dietary fat is the least likely to stimulate insulin. Thus, dietary fat is not inherently fattening …

STRATEGY: Olive oil and butter, plus cream and sour cream, will be my default sources of natural, healthy fat to provide calories for my diet. I will also enjoy oily fish and fish oil capsules.

DISCERNMENT QUESTIONS
What gets my attention?
Do I understand the need or problem?
Do I understand the potential solution?
Do I understand how to apply that strategy?
What questions do I have for the experts? What might be the answers?
Who needs to hear this?
What do I do next?

SOURCE – Footnotes:
[1]  “The Obesity Code: Unlocking the Secrets of Weight Loss” by Dr. Jason Fung, Timothy Noakes, . (For more about fat as a protective factor, see chapter 18.) Page 231.

Image: On-Off Switch.jpg From Wikimedia Commons

RESOURCES

Eat the Yolks: Discover Paleo, fight food lies, and reclaim your health Kindle Edition
by Liz Wolfe. Book reviews and sample:
https://wellreadsoutherner.com/eattheyolks/
https://www.eatyourbeets.com/healthy-eating-tips/eattheyolksreview/
Sample: http://eattheyolks.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/02/Eat-the-Yolks-Preview.pdf

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50 STEP 3: MODERATE YOUR PROTEIN CONSUMPTION

QUOTE from Dr Fung (emphasis mine): 

IN CONTRAST TO refined grains, protein cannot and should not be eliminated from your diet. (For more on protein, see chapter 17.) Instead, moderate the amount of protein in your diet to fall within 20 percent to 30 percent of your total calories.” [1]

NOTE (my commentary):

In the Fung five-step recipe for weight loss, protein is an essential macronutrient; unlike carbs, you cannot live without it.

Some diets, like the Atkins diet and the Keto approach, seem to allow unrestricted consumption of protein. This has been magnified and distorted by the press as if you could eat pounds of bacon daily and still lose weight. We only lose weight when there is a calorie deficit and hormonal changes in the body turn toward the use of body fat for energy rather than glucose.

protein cannot and should not be eliminated from your diet.

The reason that I need to moderate my consumption of protein is that the body can also make glucose from protein by a process known as Gluconeogenesis. Metformin inhibits Gluconeogenesis in the liver.

Overeating protein is not a solution for obesity.

Wikipedia: Gluconeogenesis (GNG)is a metabolic pathway that results in the generation of glucose from certain non-carbohydrate carbon substrates. From breakdown of proteins, these substrates include glucogenic amino acids (although not ketogenic amino acids); from breakdown of lipids (such as triglycerides), they include glycerol, odd-chain fatty acids (although not even-chain fatty acids, see below); and from other steps in metabolism they include pyruvate and lactate.
In mammals, gluconeogenesis has been believed to be restricted to the liver, the kidney, the intestine, and muscle, but recent evidence indicates gluconeogenesis occurring in astrocytes of the brain. These organs use somewhat different gluconeogenic precursors. The liver preferentially uses lactate, glycerol, and glucogenic amino acids (especially alanine) while the kidney preferentially uses lactate, glutamine and glycerol. Lactate from the Cori cycle is quantitatively the largest source of substrate for gluconeogenesis, especially for the kidney. The liver uses both glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis to produce glucose, whereas the kidney only uses gluconeogenesis. After a meal, the liver shifts to glycogen synthesis, whereas the kidney increases gluconeogenesis.[12] The intestine uses mostly glutamine and glycerol.
The anti-diabetic drug metformin reduces blood glucose primarily through inhibition of gluconeogenesis, overcoming the failure of insulin to inhibit gluconeogenesis due to insulin resistance.

Imagine a plate divided into thirds – one-third carbohydrates, one-third protein, and one-third vegetables. Then improve the basic plate by leaving the third for carbs empty and replacing them with vegetables – 2/3 of the plate. Provide flavor to the vegetables with healthy fats such as butter or sour cream. Saute them in olive oil and garlic.

Instead, moderate the amount of protein in your diet to fall within 20 percent to 30 percent of your total calories.

STRATEGY: I will eat more vegetables and moderate my protein consumption.
I am not concerned about metformin inhibiting gluconeogenesis because this is not an issue until the body is completely emptied of glucose from other sources by fasting. If enough glucose was freed up from gluconeogenesis, it could turn off the hormonal process of using stored fat for energy.

DISCERNMENT QUESTIONS
What gets my attention?
Do I understand the need or problem?
Do I understand the potential solution?
Do I understand how to apply that strategy?
What questions do I have for the experts? What might be the answers?
Who needs to hear this?
What do I do next?

SOURCE – Footnotes:
[1]  “The Obesity Code: Unlocking the Secrets of Weight Loss” by Dr. Jason Fung, Timothy Noakes, . (For more on protein, see chapter 17.) Page 230.

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RESOURCES

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49 Carbohydrates should be enjoyed in their natural, whole, unprocessed form.

QUOTE from Dr Fung (emphasis mine): 

“Carbohydrates should be enjoyed in their natural, whole, unprocessed form. Many traditional diets built around carbohydrates cause neither poor health nor obesity. Remember: the toxicity in much Western food lies in the processing, rather than in the food itself. The carbohydrates in Western diets are heavily skewed toward refined grains, and are thus highly obesogenic. Eggplant, kale, spinach, carrots, broccoli, peas, Brussels sprouts, tomatoes, asparagus, bell peppers, zucchini, cauliflower, avocados, lettuce, beets, cucumbers, watercress, cabbage, among others, are all extremely healthy carbohydrate-containing foods.” [1]

QUOTE: “Rates of Type 2 diabetes in China have exploded in the last couple of decades. In 1980, less than 5% of Chinese men had diabetes. Now, more than 10% do…. Even more startling is the fact that almost half of all adults in China – close to 500 million people – have prediabetes…. more than half (53%) of people with diabetes in China may be undiagnosed, and according to a survey in 2010 only one-quarter (25.8%) of all people with diabetes were receiving treatment for their condition. [2]

QUOTE: Dr. Michael Greger reviews the research linking white rice consumption with the rise in type 2 diabetes, largely in Asian populations. The rate at which people in China and Japan are getting diabetes has skyrocketed in the past decade and is now very similar to the incidence in the United States. However, China has seven times less obesity and Japan has eight times less obesity than the United States. So what’s going on?
China’s Diabetes Rate Has More Than Tripled, But Their Obesity Rate Has Not
Looking at the data, Dr. Greger found that the rate of new type 2 diabetes diagnoses has sharply increased, while rice consumption has actually decreased by 30 percent. Pork, oil, and other meat consumption has sharply increased in the past 16 years…. Dr. Greger theorizes that it’s the addition of animal protein. When ingested, carbohydrates cause a spike in blood glucose, triggering the pancreas to secrete insulin. Studies show that when animal protein is added to refined carbs, the blood sugar spike is much higher.

NOTE (my commentary)

China is known as a country where rice is the staple of the diet. Not brown rice, but processed white rice. But the increase in prosperity has made it possible for the Chinese to eat more processed foods, and the explosion in diabetes follows this change to a more processed, Western-style diet, not simply a diet high in carbohydrates. In 1980, the prevalence of Type 2 Diabetes was 1% of the population. Now it is more than ten times that, with a concern that more than half the population is prediabetes and that 75% of those with the disease are undiagnosed.

So, rice consumption is down 30%. Obesity remains low. Diabetes is skyrocketing. Higher blood sugar levels due to the western diet are fueling insulin resistance, which causes type 2 diabetes. Dr. Fung suggests that processing removes factors which protect us, causing previously healthy foods to become food that is unhealthy for human consumption.

Remember: the toxicity in much Western food lies in the processing, rather than in the food itself.

Is there such a thing in reality as “whole grain”? Commercial “Whole Wheat Bread” in the USA is largely white bread made with processed flour and colored brown by the addition of molasses. It causes a blood sugar spike.

Brown rice is unprocessed.
Oatmeal is rolled oats, pressed flat.

China’s Diabetes Rate Has More Than Tripled, But Their Obesity Rate Has Not

STRATEGY: I need to remove processed foods from my diet as much as possible. Oatmeal is acceptable, but it is a carb.

DISCERNMENT QUESTIONS
What gets my attention?
Do I understand the need or problem?
Do I understand the potential solution?
Do I understand how to apply that strategy?
What questions do I have for the experts? What might be the answers?
Who needs to hear this?
What do I do next?

SOURCE – Footnotes:
[1]  “The Obesity Code: Unlocking the Secrets of Weight Loss” by Dr. Jason Fung, Timothy Noakes. Page 229.

[2] Rate of diabetes in China “explosive,” 6 April 2016 World Health Organization (WHO) News release Beijing https://www.who.int/china/news/detail/06-04-2016-rate-of-diabetes-in-china-explosive-

[3] Is White Rice to Blame for Skyrocketing Type 2 Diabetes in China? By Julia Helms, March 28, 2016, https://www.forksoverknives.com/type-2-diabetes-tripled-china-obesity-not/#gs.yx1skq

RESOURCES

As China puts on weight, type-2 diabetes is soaring, https://www.economist.com/china/2019/12/12/as-china-puts-on-weight-type-2-diabetes-is-soaring

Diabetes in China: Epidemiology and Genetic Risk Factors and Their Clinical Utility in Personalized Medication by Cheng Hu and Weiping Jia, https://diabetes.diabetesjournals.org/content/67/1/3

” High prevalence of diabetes, prediabetes in China,” Science Daily, June 27, 2017, https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/06/170627134326.htm

White Rice Consumption Not Associated With Higher Risk Of Type-2 Diabetes: Study
A new study published in the European Journal of Nutrition has said that high consumption of rice is not associated with higher risks of Type-2 diabetes.
FoodNDTV Food DeskUpdated: December 14, 2018 02:41 pm IST, https://www.ndtv.com/food/white-rice-consumption-not-associated-with-higher-risk-of-type-2-diabetes-study-1962630
Quote: “Rice intake was not associated with higher T2D risk… although the precise risk estimate depended greatly on the substitute food.” The study also concluded that replacing one daily serving of rice with noodles, red meat and poultry was associated with high Type-2 diabetes risk. Whereas, replacement of rice with portion of white bread or wholemeal bread was linked to lower risk of Type-2 diabetes.

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48 N+S STEP 2: REDUCE YOUR CONSUMPTION OF REFINED GRAINS

QUOTE from Dr Fung (emphasis mine): 

REFINED GRAINS SUCH as white flour stimulate insulin to a greater degree than virtually any other food. If you reduce your consumption of flour and refined grains, you will substantially improve your weight-loss potential. White flour, being nutritionally bankrupt, can be safely reduced or even eliminated from your diet. Enriched white flours have had all their nutrients stripped out during processing and later added back to retain a veneer of healthiness.” [1]

NOTE (my commentary)

t

REFINED GRAINS SUCH as white flour stimulate insulin to a greater degree than virtually any other food.

t

If you reduce your consumption of flour and refined grains, you will substantially improve your weight-loss potential.

t

STRATEGY:

DISCERNMENT QUESTIONS
What gets my attention?
Do I understand the need or problem?
Do I understand the potential solution?
Do I understand how to apply that strategy?
What questions do I have for the experts? What might be the answers?
Who needs to hear this?
What do I do next?

SOURCE – Footnotes:
[1]  “The Obesity Code: Unlocking the Secrets of Weight Loss” by Dr. Jason Fung, Timothy Noakes. Page 228.

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47 Permanent weight loss is actually a two-step process.

QUOTE from Dr Fung (emphasis mine): 

“So all diets fail. The question is why. Permanent weight loss is actually a two-step process. There is a short-term and a long-term (or time-dependent) problem. The hypothalamic region of the brain determines the body set weight—the fat thermostat. (For more on body set weight, see chapters 6 and 10.) Insulin acts here to set body set weight higher. In the short term, we can use various diets to bring our actual body weight down. However, once it falls below the body set weight, the body activates mechanisms to regain that weight—and that’s the long-term problem. This resistance to weight loss has been proven both scientifically and empirically. Obese persons that had lost weight required fewer calories because their metabolisms had slowed dramatically and desire to eat accelerates. The body actively resists long-term weight loss.”

NOTE (my commentary):

All diets work in the short run. All diets fail in the long run. Our culture is focused on short term results and tends to ignore permanent results. I want results that last.

Long term results require changing the body’s “setpoint” for what the body considers a healthy weight. That’s the setting on the “fat thermostat” – which is controlled by levels of insulin, according to Dr Fung.

Insulin acts here to set body set weight higher.

Short-term diets ignore the fat thermostat and trigger processes to restore body fat the moment that more calories become available. The dieter’s metabolisms had slowed dramatically, requiring fewer calories to function, and so the desire to eat accelerates. Extra calories soon restore fat to and often beyond previous levels. So, the outcome of unwise short-term dieting is yo-yo dieting, rising cycles of inevitable weight gain after weight loss.

Unwise short-term dieting convinces the body that a famine is happening. Metabolism is reduced to cope with fewer calories coming in. When calories become available, physical cravings of hunger are stimulated while metabolism remains low, resulting in rapid weight regain. The body is preparing for survival through the next famine of calorie restriction when there is less food on hand.

However, once it falls below the body set weight, the body activates mechanisms to regain that weight—and that’s the long-term problem.

STRATEGY: I need a long term solution that increases metabolism and does not trigger my body’s famine defense. I need the energy to become a hunter-gatherer.

DISCERNMENT QUESTIONS
What gets my attention?
Do I understand the need or problem?
Do I understand the potential solution?
Do I understand how to apply that strategy?
What questions do I have for the experts? What might be the answers?
Who needs to hear this?
What do I do next?

SOURCE – Footnotes:
[1]  “The Obesity Code: Unlocking the Secrets of Weight Loss” by Dr. Jason Fung, Timothy Noakes – Page 215.

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46 We need multiple targets and treatments. We don’t need to choose sides.

QUOTE from Dr Fung (emphasis mine): 

“The same approach is necessary to address the multidimensional problem of obesity. Instead of targeting a single point in the obesity cascade, we need multiple targets and treatments. We don’t need to choose sides. Rather than compare a dietary strategy of, say, low calorie versus low carb, why not do both? There is no reason we can’t. It is also important to tailor the approach individually to address the cause of the high insulin levels. For example, if chronic sleep deprivation is the main problem causing weight gain, then decreasing refined grains is not likely to help. If excessive sugar intake is the problem, then mindfulness meditation is not going to be especially useful. Obesity is a hormonal disorder of fat regulation. Insulin is the major hormone that drives weight gain, so the rational therapy is to lower insulin levels. There are multiple ways to achieve this, and we should take advantage of each one. In the rest of this chapter, I will outline a step-by-step approach to accomplish this goal.”

NOTE (my commentary):

Obesity has multiple causes and multiple treatment paths. Unhelpful journalism often poses them in competition with each other to arouse reader interest and create a conflict. Successful treatment is rarely “either/or” and is often “both/and” – a confluence of causes will often require a combination of treatments.

Insulin is the major hormone that drives weight gain, so the rational therapy is to lower insulin levels.

Still, as insulin converts sugar to fat inside the body, the role of insulin is not minimal and needs my focus.

It is also important to tailor the approach individually to address the cause of the high insulin levels.

STRATEGY: I need to focus on what insulin does within my body because “Insulin is the major hormone that drives weight gain.” Insulin is the switch that causes weight gain.

DISCERNMENT QUESTIONS
What gets my attention?
Do I understand the need or problem?
Do I understand the potential solution?
Do I understand how to apply that strategy?
What questions do I have for the experts? What might be the answers?
Who needs to hear this?
What do I do next?

SOURCE – Footnotes:
[1]  “The Obesity Code: Unlocking the Secrets of Weight Loss” by Dr. Jason Fung, Timothy Noakes – Page 219.

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45 Coffee: more than caffeine

QUOTE from Dr Fung (emphasis mine): 

“DUE TO ITS high caffeine content, coffee is sometimes considered unhealthy. However, recent research has come to the opposite conclusion, perhaps due to the fact that coffee is a major source of antioxidants, magnesium, lignans and chlorogenic acid. Coffee, even the decaffeinated version, appears to protect against type 2 diabetes. In a 2009 review, each additional daily cup of coffee lowered the risk of diabetes by 7 percent, even up to six cups per day. The European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study estimated that drinking at least three cups of coffee or tea daily reduced the risk of diabetes by 42 percent. The Singapore Chinese Health Study showed a 30 percent reduction in risk. Coffee drinking is associated with a 10 percent to 15 percent reduction in total mortality. Large-scale studies found that most major causes of death, including heart disease were reduced. Coffee may guard against the neurologic diseases Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s disease, liver cirrhosis and liver cancer. A word of caution here: While these correlation studies are suggestive, they are not proof of benefit. However, they suggest that coffee may not be as harmful as we imagined.”

NOTE (my commentary)

Correlation is not causation … if coffee drinkers live longer, healthier lives, that does not prove that it is the coffee. But it does suggest a link. Coffee (and tea), besides water, may be the most beneficial beverages for us to drink for health.

Coffee, even the decaffeinated version, appears to protect against type 2 diabetes.

Since caffeine is an ingredient, the choice of coffee may depend on whether caffeine has negative effects on your sleep, or jitters when you are awake.

Coffee drinking is associated with a 10 percent to 15 percent reduction in total mortality.

STRATEGY: Coffee is good for me. Of course, my habit of adding milk, way too much sugar in childhood and artificial sweetener in adulthood, is not so good. It would be better to drink it black and unadulterated, “like an adult” – I like to joke.

DISCERNMENT QUESTIONS
What gets my attention?
Do I understand the need or problem?
Do I understand the potential solution?
Do I understand how to apply that strategy?
What questions do I have for the experts? What might be the answers?
Who needs to hear this?
What do I do next?

SOURCE – Footnotes:
[1]  “The Obesity Code: Unlocking the Secrets of Weight Loss” by Dr. Jason Fung, Timothy Noakes – tk

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44 If you are not hungry, don’t eat anything at all.

QUOTE from Dr Fung (emphasis mine): 

Make breakfast optional. And thinking about what to eat for breakfast, consider this: If you are not hungry, don’t eat anything at all.

NOTE (my commentary): Fasting is time-restricted eating. If you are not hungry. why eat? If fasting involves skipping a meal, why not breakfast?

Make breakfast optional.

The religion of not skipping breakfast – how did it originate?

With the dawn phenomenon, sugar levels are naturally higher in the morning … as if you had already eaten breakfast. Is it necessary to add to that sugar?

 If you are not hungry, don’t eat anything at all.

Consider the typical breakfast – high in sugar, high in processed carbs. Box cereal, pancakes, French toast, grits, doughnuts, pastry, breakfast bars … and the one meal where there is no traditional breakfast food made up of green, leafy vegetables. Onions and peppers in an omelet are more a garnish than a major part of the meal!

STRATEGY: Although consuming calories earlier in the day is wise, it makes sense to me to skip breakfast and/or not eat until my blood sugar levels are normal. That’s most likely in the morning.

DISCERNMENT QUESTIONS
What gets my attention?
Do I understand the need or problem?
Do I understand the potential solution?
Do I understand how to apply that strategy?
What questions do I have for the experts? What might be the answers?
Who needs to hear this?
What do I do next?

SOURCE – Footnotes:
[1]  “The Obesity Code: Unlocking the Secrets of Weight Loss” by Dr. Jason Fung, Timothy Noakes – Page 223.

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43 “Just don’t snack.”

QUOTE from Dr Fung (emphasis mine): 

THE HEALTHY SNACK is one of the greatest weight-loss deceptions. The myth that “grazing is healthy” has attained legendary status. If we were meant to “graze,” we would be cows. Grazing is the direct opposite of virtually all food traditions. Even as recently as the 1960s, most people still ate just three meals per day. Constant stimulation of insulin eventually leads to insulin resistance. (For more on the dangers of snacking, see chapters 10 and 11.) The solution? Stop eating all the time.

Are snacks necessary? Simply ask yourself this question. Are you really hungry or just bored? Keep snacks completely out of sight. 

If you have a snack habit, replace that habit loop with one that is less destructive to your health. Perhaps a cup of green tea in the afternoon should be your new habit. There’s a simple answer to the question of what to eat at snack time. Nothing. Don’t eat snacks. Period. Simplify your life. [1]

NOTE (my commentary):

I am constantly amazed by the assumption of many dieticians that the worst thing that can happen to a healthy human being is to feel hunger. Feeling hunger is a natural experience, but there is no reason to prevent the feeling of hunger. Hunger is not an illness; hunger is not a problem. Hunger is the signal that it is time to eat.

What to eat at snack time: Nothing. Don’t eat snacks. Period.

The obesity trend began to rise when snacking was recommended in addition to the basic pattern of three meals a day. In the old days, parents warned against eating between meals because “you’ll ruin your appetite” and there was much less obesity. The “healthy snack” is an oxymoron and a fairy tale – a billion-dollar industry created by food manufacturers, and like most convenience foods, it is packed with sugar and calories. Snacking on carbohydrates and sugar stimulates an impulsive hunger for more of the same, if not an addiction; I know this by experience – “bet you can’t eat just one” is a realistic working hypothesis. Like an alcoholic and the first drink, sugar stimulates physical hunger for more sugar, in my personal experience.

Constant stimulation of insulin eventually leads to insulin resistance.

It appears to be healthy for the body to eat, and then process food to empty before eating again. Insulin rises when we eat and declines between meals. This cycling from low insulin to high and back to low is a good thing, but it is prevented by continuing to eat between meals and after supper.

What happens then to all those snacks? They are all still with you – around your waist. Turn the snack switch to off.

STRATEGY: Eat only at mealtimes, and no more than three meals a day. Do not eat between meals and after 7 pm. (Coffee – the way I drink it – is a meal.)

DISCERNMENT QUESTIONS
What gets my attention?
Do I understand the need or problem?
Do I understand the potential solution?
Do I understand how to apply that strategy?
What questions do I have for the experts? What might be the answers?
Who needs to hear this?
What do I do next?

SOURCE – Footnotes:
[1]  “The Obesity Code: Unlocking the Secrets of Weight Loss” by Dr. Jason Fung, Timothy Noakes – Page 222.

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42 STEP 1: REDUCE YOUR CONSUMPTION OF ADDED SUGARS

QUOTE from Dr Fung (emphasis mine): 

“STEP 1: REDUCE YOUR CONSUMPTION OF ADDED SUGARS

SUGAR STIMULATES INSULIN secretion, but it is far more sinister than that. Sugar is particularly fattening because it increases insulin both immediately and over the long term. Sugar is comprised of equal amounts of glucose and fructose, as discussed in chapter 14, and fructose contributes directly to insulin resistance in the liver. Over time, insulin resistance leads to higher insulin levels. Therefore, sucrose and high fructose corn syrup are exceptionally fattening, far in excess of other foods. Sugar is uniquely fattening because it directly produces insulin resistance. With no redeeming nutritional qualities, added sugars are usually one of the first foods to be eliminated in any diet.” [1]

NOTE (my commentary):

At the simplest level, a high level of glucose sugar in the blood indicates that there is too much sugar in my body. If I decrease the sugar entering my digestive system, the level of glucose in my blood will obviously decrease.

Sugar is uniquely fattening because it directly produces insulin resistance.

It makes sense then to eliminate added sugar by:

  • Hide the sugar bowl. There is no logical reason to add table sugar to anything at the table.
  • There is no logical reason to add table sugar to anything while cooking. It’s wiser to adjust a recipe that calls for sugar, or look for a different recipe.
  • It’s wise to watch for sugar hidden in various processed foods. Fortunately, I don’t have much of a sweet tooth today and can easily do without.
  • One exception may be condiments, as the flavor is worth it, but it makes sense to be aware while shopping and examine labels.

fructose contributes directly to insulin resistance in the liver.

STRATEGY: No added sugar, make careful choices with processed foods, and avoid fructose as much as possible.

DISCERNMENT QUESTIONS
What gets my attention?
Do I understand the need or problem?
Do I understand the potential solution?
Do I understand how to apply that strategy?
What questions do I have for the experts? What might be the answers?
Who needs to hear this?
What do I do next?

SOURCE – Footnotes:
[1]  “The Obesity Code: Unlocking the Secrets of Weight Loss” by Dr. Jason Fung, Timothy Noakes – Page 219.

Photo by Patricia Piolon, Sugar, via Flickr.com.

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